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Kabell Mockbell and his coffee empire

journal contribution
posted on 08.04.2019, 00:00 by Alison Vincent
The story of Kabell Mockbell and his coffee empire demonstrates how the biographies of individuals, and even the limited amount of knowledge gained from secondary sources, can expand an appreciation of the past and challenge popular preconceptions. Mockbell was a self-described ‘Egyptian Turk, of Arab parentage’ (Anon. 1915: 8) living in Sydney throughout the First World War, negotiating the challenges of allegiance to his ancestry and to his new home. He was part of a cosmopolitan community long before post-World War Two migration brought large numbers of Europeans to Australia and government policies encouraged multiculturalism. Despite the popular belief that today’s coffee culture owes its origins to the espresso bars of the 1950s, Mockbell should be acknowledged as a much earlier personage to bring the coffee shop to Sydney.

History

Volume

7

Issue

2

Start Page

225

End Page

238

Number of Pages

14

eISSN

2045-5860

ISSN

2045-5852

Publisher

Intellect, UK

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Australasian Journal of Popular Culture