Is self-reporting workplace activity worthwhile_ Validity and reliability of occupational sitting and physical activity questionnaire in desk-based workers.pdf (540.49 kB)
Download file

Is self-reporting workplace activity worthwhile? Validity and reliability of occupational sitting and physical activity questionnaire in desk-based workers

Download (540.49 kB)
journal contribution
posted on 27.04.2022, 04:27 by Scott J Pedersen, Cecilia KiticCecilia Kitic, Marie-Louise Bird, Casey P Mainsbridge, P Dean Cooley
Background: With the advent of workplace health and wellbeing programs designed to address prolonged occupational sitting, tools to measure behaviour change within this environment should derive from empirical evidence. In this study we measured aspects of validity and reliability for the Occupational Sitting and Physical Activity Questionnaire that asks employees to recount the percentage of work time they spend in the seated, standing, and walking postures during a typical workday. Methods: Three separate cohort samples (N = 236) were drawn from a population of government desk-based employees across several departmental agencies. These volunteers were part of a larger state-wide intervention study. Workplace sitting and physical activity behaviour was measured both subjectively against the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, and objectively against ActivPal accelerometers before the intervention began. Criterion validity and concurrent validity for each of the three posture categories were assessed using Spearman's rank correlation coefficients, and a bias comparison with 95 % limits of agreement. Test-retest reliability of the survey was reported with intraclass correlation coefficients. Results: Criterion validity for this survey was strong for sitting and standing estimates, but weak for walking. Participants significantly overestimated the amount of walking they did at work. Concurrent validity was moderate for sitting and standing, but low for walking. Test-retest reliability of this survey proved to be questionable for our sample. Conclusions: Based on our findings we must caution occupational health and safety professionals about the use of employee self-report data to estimate workplace physical activity. While the survey produced accurate measurements for time spent sitting at work it was more difficult for employees to estimate their workplace physical activity.

Funding

Category 3 - Industry and Other Research Income

History

Volume

16

Issue

1

Start Page

1

End Page

6

Number of Pages

6

eISSN

1471-2458

ISSN

1471-2458

Location

England

Publisher

BioMed Central

Publisher License

CC BY

Additional Rights

CC BY 4.0

Language

eng

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

Yes

Acceptance Date

17/08/2016

External Author Affiliations

University of Tasmania

Era Eligible

Yes

Medium

Electronic

Journal

BMC Public Health

Article Number

836