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Insights from the Northern Territory on factors that facilitate effective palliative care for Aboriginal peoples

journal contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 by Pamela Mcgrath, Emma Phillips
This article aims to assist remote communities to develop their own palliative care services by providing findings on successful strategies identified through a 2 year research project which developed an innovative model for Indigenous palliative care. The discussion is set in the context of an understanding of the notion of cultural safety and discusses the positive experiences of the benefits of palliative care from the perspectives of both consumers and health professionals. The findings show that successful outcomes are derived from generic factors associated with palliative care philosophy and practice and from more specific factors, including the provision of pragmatic support to overcome practical problems and community visits by health professionals. Factors specific to cultural respect are important, including familiarity and continuity of health care providers, cultural respect for grieving practices, provision of comfort food and bush tucker, development of culturally appropriate built environments, use of traditional healers and respect for spiritual practices.

Funding

Category 3 - Industry and Other Research Income

History

Volume

33

Issue

4

Start Page

636

End Page

644

Number of Pages

9

eISSN

1449-8944

ISSN

0156-5788

Location

Canberra, ACT

Publisher

Australasian Medical Publishing Company

Language

en-aus

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

Faculty of Sciences, Engineering and Health; Institute for Health and Social Science Research (IHSSR); International Program of Psycho-Social Health Research;

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Australian health review.

Exports