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Influences on help-seeking decisions for behavioral child sleep problems: Why parents do and do not seek help

journal contribution
posted on 06.06.2021, 23:59 by Adam T Newton, Penny V Corkum, Sarah BlundenSarah Blunden, Graham J Reid
Objectives: Behavioral sleep problems affect 25% of children and impact functioning, but little is known about help-seeking for these problems. We identified (1) predictors for sleep problem perception and help-seeking, using nested-logit regression and (2) reasons why parents did not seek professional help for sleep problems, using chi-square. Methods: Parents (N = 407) of children (2–10-years-old) completed the study online. Parents indicated whether their child had no sleep problem, a mild problem, or a moderate-to-severe problem and completed additional questionnaires on parent/child functioning. Results: Overall, 5.4% ± 2.2% of parents sought professional help for a child sleep problem. Greater child sleep problem severity and greater child socioemotional problems were significant predictors of parents perceiving a sleep problem. Among parents who perceived a sleep problem, greater parental socioemotional problems significantly predicted professional help-seeking. Parents who perceived no problem or a mild sleep problem reported not needing professional help as the main reason for not seeking help; parents who perceived a moderate-to-severe problem reported logistic barriers most often (e.g. treatment unavailability, cost). Conclusions: Problem perception and help-seeking predictors resemble the children’s mental health literature. Differences in barriers, based on problem severity, suggest differential help-seeking interventions are needed (e.g. education vs access).

History

Volume

26

Issue

1

Start Page

207

End Page

221

Number of Pages

15

eISSN

1461-7021

ISSN

1359-1045

Location

England

Publisher

Sage Publications

Language

eng

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

University of Western Ontario, Canada; Dalhousie University, Canada

Author Research Institute

Appleton Institute

Era Eligible

Yes

Medium

Print-Electronic

Journal

Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry

Article Number

ARTN 1359104520963375