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Improving outcomes of cognitive behavioural therapy in the treatment of schizophrenia

journal contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 by Gregory LewisGregory Lewis, Kevin RonanKevin Ronan
Research on the effectiveness of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) in reducing the subjective impact of psychotic experience in individuals with schizophrenia is equivocal. Many studies report CBT to benefit individuals with schizophrenia in their management of residual symptoms, selfawareness and treatment adherence. However, only small to medium effect sizes are reported, and methodological limitations temper enthusiasm. LEWIS and RONAN suggest CBT outcomes in the treatment of schizophrenia can be enhanced through the application of neurocognitive remediation methods prior to CBT. Cognitive remediation therapy (CRT) is designed to remedy attention, memory and executive functioning deficits of neurocognitive functioning in schizophrenia through a process of individualised instruction and repeated exposure to relevant training tasks. Improvement of information processing capacity, declarative memory and task-related planning, sequencing and self-monitoring capacity can improve cognitive and social functioning, lessen vulnerability, and ‘prime’ the individual for a CBT and skills-based intervention.

Funding

Category 1 - Australian Competitive Grants (this includes ARC, NHMRC)

History

Volume

16

Issue

4

Start Page

70

End Page

76

Number of Pages

7

ISSN

1446-1625

Location

Australia

Publisher

Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy Association of Australia

Language

en-aus

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

Baillie Henderson Hospital; Faculty of Sciences, Engineering and Health; Institute for Health and Social Science Research (IHSSR);

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Psychotherapy in Australia.

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