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Implementing evidence-based physical activity interventions for people with mental illness: an Australian perspective

journal contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 authored by S Rosenbaum, A Tiedemann, Robert StantonRobert Stanton, A Parker, A Waterreus, J Curtis, P Ward
Objectives: Physical activity (PA) and exercise is increasingly being recognised as an efficacious component of treatment for various mental disorders. The association between PA and cardiometabolic disease is well established, as is the strong link between mental illness, sedentary behaviour and poor cardiometabolic health. Examples of successful integration of clinical PA programs within mental health treatment facilities are increasing. The aim of this review was to summarise the evidence regarding PA and mental illness, and to present examples of clinical exercise programs within Australian mental health facilities. Methods: A narrative synthesis of systematic reviews and clinical trials was conducted. Results: Evidence supporting the inclusion of PA programs as an adjunct to treatment for various conditions was presented; including depression, schizophrenia, anxiety disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder and substance abuse. In light of the available evidence, the inclusion of clinical PA programs within mental health treatment, facilitated by dedicated clinicians (exercise physiologists / physiotherapists) was justified. Conclusions: PA is a feasible, effective and acceptable adjunct to usual care for a variety of mental disorders. There is a clear need for greater investment in initiatives aiming to increase PA among people experiencing mental illness, given the benefits to both mental and physical health outcomes.

History

Volume

24

Issue

1

Start Page

149

End Page

154

Number of Pages

6

eISSN

1440-1665

ISSN

1039-8562

Publisher

Sage Publications

Language

en-aus

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

Bondi Centre; George Institute for Global Health; Headspace National Youth Mental Health Foundation Ltd; School of Medical and Applied Sciences (2013- ); South Western Sydney Local Health District (Liverpool); TBA Research Institute; University of Melbourne; University of New South Wales; University of Sydney; University of Western Australia;

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Australasian psychiatry.