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Impact of theory and clinical placement on undergraduate students' mental health nursing knowledge, skills, and attitudes

journal contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 authored by S Henderson, Brenda Happell, T Martin
Mental health issues are common and contemporary nursing students need to be well prepared to meet the mental health care needs of Australians. This study explored the influence of the mental health component of a Bachelor of Nursing course on second-year undergraduate nursing students’ self-reported knowledge, skills, and attitudes in relation to mental health nursing. The study used a quasiexperimental research design involving questionnaires and individual interviews to determine nursing students’ self-reported knowledge, skills, attitudes. Questionnaires were administered prior to undertaking the mental health theory, repeated prior to undertaking a clinical placement in either a community or inpatient mental health setting, and again after the clinical placement. The findings of the study indicated that a positive clinical placement had the greatest influence on nursing students’ self-reported knowledge, skills, and attitudes and interest in nursing people experiencing mental health problems; however, the quantity of theoretical education also emerged as an influencing variable.

Funding

Category 1 - Australian Competitive Grants (this includes ARC, NHMRC)

History

Volume

16

Issue

2

Start Page

116

End Page

125

Number of Pages

10

ISSN

1445-8330

Location

Australia

Publisher

Blackwell Pub

Language

en-aus

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

Faculty of Sciences, Engineering and Health; Institute for Health and Social Science Research (IHSSR); School of Nursing and Midwifery; University of Melbourne; Victorian Institute of Forensic Mental Health;

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

International journal of mental health nursing.

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