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Impact of a work-based feedback intervention on student performance during clinical placements in acute-care healthcare settings: A quasi-experimental protocol for the REMARK programme

journal contribution
posted on 02.12.2020, 00:00 by C Ossenberg, M Mitchell, Amanda Henderson
Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ. Introduction Current perspectives present feedback as a dynamic, dialogic process. It is widely accepted that feedback can have an impact on workplace performance, however, how dialogic feedback is enacted with the learner in authentic healthcare settings is less apparent. This paper seeks to describe the design and development of an implementation study to promote the learner voice in the feedback process and improve feedback encounters between learners and learning partners in healthcare settings. Methods and analysis A quasi-experimental study design will be used to evaluate whether implementation of a work-based intervention to improve feedback impacts student performance during clinical placements in healthcare settings. Student performance will be measured at three time points: baseline (pre), mid-placement (post-Test 1) and end-placement (post-Test 2) in keeping with standard assessment processes of the participating university. The intervention is underpinned by Normalisation Process Theory and involves a layered design that targets learners and learning partners using best-practice education strategies. Data regarding participants' engagement with feedback during clinical placements and participants' level of adoption of the intervention will be collected at the completion of the clinical placement period. Ethics and dissemination This study has ethics approval from both Griffith University and Metro South Health Human Research and Ethics committees. Dissemination of results will be local, national and international through forums, seminars, conferences and publications. © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2020.

History

Volume

10

Issue

6

Start Page

1

End Page

10

eISSN

2044-6055

Publisher

BMJ

Additional Rights

CC BY-NC 4.0

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

Yes

Acceptance Date

29/04/2020

External Author Affiliations

Griffith University

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

BMJ Open

Usage metrics

CQUniversity

Exports