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Identification of higher hospital costs and more frequent admissions among mid-aged Australian women who self-report diabetes mellitus

journal contribution
posted on 09.03.2018, 00:00 by J Stewart Williams, R Ling, AM Searles, Christopher DoranChristopher Doran, J Byles
© 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.Objective To ascertain whether the hospital costs for mid-aged Australian women who self-reported diabetes mellitus (DM) and who had one or more hospital admission during an eight and a half year period were higher than the hospital costs for other similarly aged non-DM women. Methods The sample comprised 2,392 mid-aged women, resident in New South Wales (NSW) Australia and participating in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH), who had any NSW hospital admissions during the eight and a half year period 1 July 2000 to 31 December 2008. Analyses were conducted on linked data from ALSWH surveys and the NSW Admitted Patient Data Collection (APDC). Hospital costs were compared for the DM and non-DM cohorts of women. A generalized linear model measured the association between hospital costs and self-reported DM. Results Eight and a half year hospital costs were 41% higher for women who self-reported DM in the ALSWH surveys (p < 0.0001). On average, women who self-reported DM had significantly (p < 0.0001) more hospital admissions (5.3) than women with no reported DM (3.4). The average hospital stay per admission was not significantly different between the two groups of women. Conclusions Self-reported DM status in mid-aged Australian women is a predictor of higher hospital costs. This simple measure can be a useful indicator for public policy makers planning early-stage interventions that target people in the population at risk of DM.

Funding

Other

History

Volume

90

Start Page

58

End Page

63

Number of Pages

6

eISSN

1873-4111

ISSN

0378-5122

Publisher

Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

University of Newcastle; Umeå University, Sweden; Hunter Medical Research Institute

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Maturitas