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Human error during the multilevel responses to three Australian bushfire disasters

journal contribution
posted on 25.02.2019, 00:00 by B Brooks, S Curnin, Christopher BearmanChristopher Bearman, C Owen
The scale and complexity associated with the coordinated response to natural disasters inevitably produce human errors. However, little is known about the frequency and distribution of human error at different levels of coordination during disasters. The purpose of this research was to explore this phenomenon for selected catastrophic bushfires in Australia. To accomplish this, we used the Human Factors Analysis and Classification System that has been widely applied to accidents but is untested with respect to the complexity and temporality of disasters. The results identified that decision errors made during these disasters differed depending upon the level of coordination but were associated with information uncertainty, fatigue, coordination complexities, procedural violations, and degraded personal interactions. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd

Funding

Category 4 - CRC Research Income

History

Volume

26

Issue

4

Start Page

440

End Page

452

Number of Pages

13

eISSN

1468-5973

ISSN

0966-0879

Publisher

Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, UK

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

University of Tasmania

Author Research Institute

Appleton Institute

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management