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How well does a commercially available wearable device measure sleep in young athletes?

journal contribution
posted on 13.09.2018, 00:00 by Charli Sargent, Antonio Lastella, Georgia Romyn, N Versey, Dean Miller, Gregory Roach
The validity of a commercially available wearable device for measuring total sleep time was examined in a sample of well-trained young athletes during night-time sleep periods and daytime naps. Participants wore a FitBit HR Charge on their non-dominant wrist and had electrodes attached to their face and scalp to enable polysomnographic recordings of sleep in the laboratory. The FitBit automatically detected 24/30 night-time sleep periods but only 6/20 daytime naps. Compared with polysomnography, the FitBit overestimated total sleep time by an average of 52 ± 152 min for night-time sleep periods, and by 4 ± 8 min for daytime naps. It is important for athletes and practitioners to be aware of the limitations of wearable devices that automatically detect sleep duration. © 2018, © 2018 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Funding

Category 1 - Australian Competitive Grants (this includes ARC, NHMRC)

History

Volume

35

Issue

6

Start Page

754

End Page

758

Number of Pages

5

eISSN

1525-6073

ISSN

0742-0528

Publisher

Taylor & Francis, UK

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

Acceptance Date

24/11/2017

External Author Affiliations

Australian Institute of Sport

Author Research Institute

Appleton Institute

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Chronobiology International