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How well do truck drivers sleep in cabin sleeper berths?

journal contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 by David Darwent, Drew Dawson, Gregory Roach
The aim of this study was to evaluate the sleep obtained by livestock transport truck drivers while resting in truck sleeper berths during long-haul commercial operations. Operations were carried out in the very remote regions of Australia. The sample comprised of 32 drivers who wore wrist activity monitors and reported bed-times for a two-week period. Drivers had a mean ( standard deviation) age of 35.41 (9.78) years and had worked as truck drivers for 13.83 (9.11) years. On average, they obtained 6.07 (1.18) hours of sleep/24-h period. The majority of sleep occurred at night, but drivers occasionally supplemented their main sleep with a daytime nap. Consistent with operational demands, drivers were most likely to sleep in cabin sleeper berths (n = 394, 77%). Only a small proportion of sleeps were sampled at home (n = 63, 12%) or at truck depots (n = 56, 11%). Mixed-model ANOVA revealed that while earlier bed-times at home yielded more sleep, there were only marginal differences in sleep quality across location. No intrinsic safety concerns associated with the use of sleeper berths were identified across consecutive days of long-haul transport operations.

Funding

Category 1 - Australian Competitive Grants (this includes ARC, NHMRC)

History

Volume

43

Issue

2

Start Page

442

End Page

446

Number of Pages

5

ISSN

0003-6870

Location

United Kingdom

Publisher

ElsevierR

Language

en-aus

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Applied ergonomics : human factors in technology and society.

Exports

CQUniversity

Exports