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How well do train drivers sleep in relay vans?

journal contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 by N Lamond, Drew DawsonDrew Dawson, David DarwentDavid Darwent
Relay working operations typically require two crews of train drivers to work a totating 8-h schedule for two or more days. While one crew is driving, the other has the opportunity to sleep onboard the train. The current study investigated the impact of relay work on drivers sleep quantity and quality. Fourteen drivers wore wrist wactivity monitors and completed sleep/wake diaries for 3 d prior to and during short (<48 h) relay trips. Drivers obtained and average of 7.8 h sleep per night while at home, and an average of 4 h sleep per opportunity during the relay trip. Sleep obtained in the relay van was associated with lonnger sleep onset latencies, lower efficiency and poorer subjective quality than sleep at home. During the relay trip, drivers obtained significantly more sleep during opportunities that occurred in the evening, than those that occurred early morning or during the day. These findings suggest that while drivers are able to obtain sleep during short relay operations, it is of poorer quality than sleep obtained at home. Further, the timing of the sleep opportunities during the relay trip impacts on the quantity and quality of sleep obtained.

Funding

Category 1 - Australian Competitive Grants (this includes ARC, NHMRC)

History

Volume

43

Start Page

98

End Page

104

Number of Pages

7

ISSN

0019-8366

Location

Japan

Publisher

National Institute of Industrial Health

Language

en-aus

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

Centre for Sleep Research;

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Industrial Health