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How tired is too tired to drive_A systematic review assessing the use of prior sleep duration to detect driving impairment_CQU.pdf (7.38 MB)

How tired is too tired to drive? A systematic review assessing the use of prior sleep duration to detect driving impairment

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Driver fatigue is a contributory factor in approximately 20% of vehicle crashes. While other causal factors (eg, drink-driving) have decreased in recent decades due to increased public education strategies and punitive measures, similar decreases have not been seen in fatigue-related crashes. Fatigued driving could be managed in a similar way to drink-driving, with an established point (ie, amount of prior sleep) after which drivers are “deemed impaired”. This systematic review aimed to provide an evidence-base for the concept of deemed impairment and to identify how much prior sleep may be required to drive safely. Four online databases were searched (PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, Embase). Eligibility requirements included a) measurement of prior sleep duration and b) driving performance indicators (eg, lane deviation) and/or outcomes (eg, crash likelihood). After screening 1940 unique records, a total of 61 studies were included. Included studies were categorised as having experimental/quasi-experimental (n = 21), naturalistic (n = 3), longitudinal (n = 1), case–control (n = 11), or cross-sectional (n = 25) designs. Findings suggest that after either 6 or 7 hours of prior sleep, a modest level of impairment is generally seen compared with after ≥ 8 hours of prior sleep (ie, well rested), depending on the test used. Crash likelihood appears to be ~30% greater after 6 or 7 hours of prior sleep, as compared to individuals who are well rested. After one night of either 4 or 5 hours of sleep, there are large decrements to driving performance and approximately double the likelihood of a crash when compared with well-rested individuals. When considering the scientific evidence, it appears that there is a notable decrease in driving performance (and associated increase in crash likelihood) when less than 5h prior sleep is obtained. This is a critical first step in establishing community standards regarding the amount of sleep required to drive safely.

Funding

Category 2 - Other Public Sector Grants Category

History

Volume

15

Start Page

175

End Page

206

Number of Pages

32

eISSN

1179-1608

ISSN

1179-1608

Publisher

Dove Medical Press

Publisher License

CC BY-NC

Additional Rights

CC BY-NC 3.0 DEED

Language

en

Peer Reviewed

  • Yes

Open Access

  • Yes

Acceptance Date

2023-02-03

Author Research Institute

  • Appleton Institute

Era Eligible

  • Yes

Medium

Electronic-eCollection

Journal

Nature and Science of Sleep

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