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How does fatigue influence community-based exercise participation in people with multiple sclerosis?

journal contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 by C Smith, K Olson, L Hale, D Baxter, Anthony Schneiders
Abstract Purpose. Regular exercise is considered important for long-term health outcomes and fatigue management in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS); however, little is known about the experiences of individuals with MS-related fatigue, who participate in community-based exercise activities. The aim of this study was to describe the experiences of people with MS-related fatigue,who engaged in community-based exercise activities in order to discover how fatigue influenced their exercise participation. Method. In this study, we used qualitative methodology based on the interpretive description approach to collect and analyse data. Individuals with MS, who experienced fatigue and regularly participated in community-based exercise activities, were interviewed. Interviews were audio taped and transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed using an inductive thematic approach with multi-step verification strategies. Results. We found that perceived control over MS-related fatigue influenced exercise choices in our participants. Furthermore, perceived control over fatigue was influenced by seven factors: wellness philosophy, a related goal, belief that control was possible, feeling safe and supported, ability to manage limits, being satisfied with trade-offs and positive definition of self. Conclusion. Identification of factors influencing perceived control over fatigue will assist health care providers when facilitating community exercise choices for people with MS.

Funding

Category 1 - Australian Competitive Grants (this includes ARC, NHMRC)

History

Volume

33

Issue

23-24

Start Page

2362

End Page

2371

Number of Pages

10

eISSN

1464-5165

ISSN

0963-8288

Location

United Kingdom

Publisher

Informa Healthcare

Language

en-aus

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

TBA Research Institute; University of Alberta; University of Otago;

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Disability and rehabilitation.

Exports

CQUniversity

Exports