File(s) not publicly available

Happy high performing managers: Self-sustaining 'urban myth' or a cause for optimism?

journal contribution
posted on 20.11.2019, 00:00 by Peter HosiePeter Hosie, M Willemyns, B Lehaney
A seminal question in human resource management is revisited by this investigation: ‘Do happy managers perform better than their discontented counterparts?’ This study provides support for the ‘happy-performing managers’ proposition by linking managers’ affective wellbeing and intrinsic job satisfaction with their contextual and task performance. The ‘happy-productive worker’ thesis has intrigued organisational researchers and practitioners for decades. Despite mixed empirical evidence from research, there is support in the literature and by practitioners for the notion that ‘a happy worker is a good worker’. A variation on the enduring debate of the happiness–productivity theme is presented, the ‘happy-performing managers’ proposition. An empirical study of Australian managers is reported to indicate which aspects of affective wellbeing predict their specific contextual and task performance. The emphasis was on investigating an aspect of human behaviour with the potential to enhance managerial performance. An empirical methodology was used to test the hypotheses and develop a Partial Model of Managers’ Affective Wellbeing, Intrinsic Job Satisfaction and Performance. Survey items were derived from the literature and administered to managers from Australian organizations using self–report on established affective wellbeing and intrinsic job satisfaction scales.

History

Volume

4

Issue

15

Start Page

375

End Page

386

Number of Pages

12

eISSN

1944-6934

ISSN

1557-718X

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

University of Wollongong in Dubai, United Arab Emirates

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

International Journal of Arts and Sciences

Usage metrics

Exports