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Flood impacts in Keppel Bay, Southern Great Barrier Reef in the aftermath of cyclonic rainfall

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journal contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 by Alison Jones, R Berkelmans
In December 2010, the highest recorded Queensland rainfall associated with Tropical Cyclone ‘Tasha’ caused flooding of the Fitzroy River in Queensland, Australia. A massive flood plume inundated coral reefs lying 12 km offshore of the Central Queensland coast near Yeppoon and caused 40–100% mortality to coral fringing many of the islands of Keppel Bay down to a depth of ∼8 m. The severity of coral mortality was influenced by the level of exposure to low salinity seawater as a result of the reef's distance from the flood plume and to a lesser extent, water depth and whether or not the reef faced the plume source. There was no evidence in this study of mortality resulting from pollutants derived from the nearby Fitzroy Catchment, at least in the short term, suggesting that during a major flood, the impact of low salinity on corals outweighs that of pollutants. Recovery of the reefs in Keppel Bay from the 2010/2011 Fitzroy River flood is likely to take 10–15 years based on historical recovery periods from a similar event in 1991; potentially impacting visitor numbers for tourism and recreational usage. In the meantime, activities like snorkeling, diving and coral viewing will be focused on the few shallow reefs that survived the flood, placing even further pressure on their recovery. Reef regeneration, restoration and rehabilitation are measures that may be needed to support tourism in the short term. However, predictions of a warming climate, lower rainfall and higher intensity summer rain events in the Central and Coastal regions of Australia over the next decade, combined with the current anthropogenic influences on water quality, are likely to slow regeneration with consequent impact on long-term reef resilience.

History

Volume

9

Issue

1

Start Page

1

End Page

11

Number of Pages

11

eISSN

1932-6203

Location

United States

Publisher

Public Library of Science

Language

en-aus

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

Australian Institute of Marine Science; School of Medical and Applied Sciences (2013- ); TBA Research Institute;

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

PLoS ONE.

Exports