File(s) not publicly available

Fatigue and short-term unplanned absences among police officers

journal contribution
posted on 05.08.2020, 00:00 by S Riedy, Drew Dawson, D Fekedulegn, M Andrew, B Vila, JM Violanti
Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to assess whether shift work, sleep loss and fatigue are related to shortterm unplanned absences in policing. Design/methodology/approach – N 5 367 police officers from the Buffalo Police Department were studied. Day-by-day work and sick leave data were obtained from the payroll. Absenteeism was defined as taking a single sick day on a regularly scheduled workday. Biomathematical models of fatigue (BMMF) predicted officers’ sleep–wake behaviors and on-duty fatigue and sleepiness. Prior sleep, fatigue and sleepiness were tested as predictors of absenteeism during the next shift. Findings – A total of 513,666 shifts and 4,868 cases of absenteeism were studied. The odds of absenteeism increased as on-duty fatigue and sleepiness increased and prior sleep decreased. This was particularly evident for swing shift officers and night shift officers who were predicted by BMMF to obtain less sleep and have greater fatigue and sleepiness than day shift officers. The odds of absenteeism were higher for female officers than male officers; this finding was not due to a differential response to sleep loss, fatigue or sleepiness.

History

Volume

43

Issue

3

Start Page

483

End Page

494

Number of Pages

12

eISSN

1758-695X

ISSN

1363-951X

Publisher

Emerald

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

Acceptance Date

19/02/2020

External Author Affiliations

State University of New York, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Washington State University, US;

Author Research Institute

Appleton Institute

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Policing: An International Journal

Exports