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Family care giving for Aboriginal peoples during end-of-life: Findings from the Northern Territory

journal contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 by Pamela McgrathPamela Mcgrath
Although there is an extensive literature on the needs and experience of family caregivers for seriously ill people, there is a distinct lack of research articles on the specific topic of Aboriginal family caregivers. The lack of available information is a particular concern in view of the fact that a national survey on the social impact of caring for terminally ill people in Australia indicates that the experience for Indigenous Australian carers is fraught with challenges of distance, social isolation, poverty, and overcrowding, as well as different cultural needs. Thus, in order to begin to address the gap in knowledge the present article provides findings on family care giving for Aboriginal peoples from an Australian National Health and Medical Research Council two year study conducted in the Northern Territory.

Funding

Category 1 - Australian Competitive Grants (this includes ARC, NHMRC)

History

Volume

7

Start Page

1

End Page

10

Number of Pages

10

ISSN

1832-2921

Location

Townsville, Qld

Publisher

James Cook University

Additional Rights

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5 Australia (CC BY-NC-ND 2.5 AU)

Language

en-aus

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

Yes

Cultural Warning

This research output may contain the names and images of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people now deceased. We apologize for any distress that may occur.

External Author Affiliations

Faculty of Sciences, Engineering and Health; International Program of Psycho-Social Health Research; Not affiliated to a Research Institute;

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Journal of Rural and Tropical Public Health