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Expression profiles of metamorphosis-related genes during natural transformations in tadpoles of wild Wood Frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus)

journal contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 by L Navarro-Martín, Chantal LanctotChantal Lanctot, C Edge, J Houlahan, V Trudeau
Numerous studies using laboratory-reared tadpoles have shown the importance of thyroid hormones (TH), thyroidreceptors (TR), and deiodinase (Dio) enzymes during anuran metamorphosis. Our study focuses on the analysis of thyroidrelatedgenes in tadpoles of wild Wood Frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus (LeConte, 1825); also known as Rana sylvatica (Cope,1889)) during metamorphosis. Results showed that, in concordance with laboratory-reared studies, thyroid receptor beta(trb) gene expression profiles presented the most marked changes. At climax and compared with premetamorphic stages, brains, tails, and gonad–mesonephros complex (GMC) tissues increased trb expression levels 5-, 21-, and 41-fold, respectively (p < 0.05). In addition, gene expression levels of brain deiodinase type II and III showed opposite trends, where 3-fold decrease and 10-fold increase were, respectively, found. This finding supports the idea that thyroid hormone, as it has been demonstrated in laboratory-reared tadpoles, is also involved in natural metamorphosis in wild tadpoles. Interestingly, and contrary to our predictions, we observed that whole brain corticotropin-releasing factor (crf) and crf receptor 1 (crfr1) gene expression levels significantly decrease through metamorphosis in wild L. sylvaticus tadpoles. Further analyses are required to determine if a role of TH in the timing of anuran gonadal development exists, as well as the importance of cell-specific and tissue-specific expression of crf and crfr1 to metamorphosis.

Funding

Category 1 - Australian Competitive Grants (this includes ARC, NHMRC)

History

Volume

90

Issue

9

Start Page

1059

End Page

1071

Number of Pages

13

eISSN

1480-3283

ISSN

0008-4301

Language

en-aus

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

Not affiliated to a Research Institute; University of New Brunswick; University of Ottawa;

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Canadian journal of zoology.