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Experimentally manipulated achievement goal state fluctuations regulate self-conscious emotional responses to feedback

journal contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 by Amanda Rebar, D Conroy
Self-conscious emotions, such as pride and shame, have important implications for performance in competence pursuits. Emotions and motivation are strongly linked and it may be that achievement goals play a role in regulating self-conscious emotions. This study investigated the effects of between-person achievement goal orientations and within-person fluctuations in achievement goal states on pride and shame responses to feedback. Undergraduate students (N = 58) completed a 24-round game of Tetris. Before each round, scoring criteria prompts were provided to manipulate achievement goals and participants rated their goals. After each round, participants received experimentally manipulated feedback and rated their pride and shame. A set of hierarchical linear models revealed that performance achievement goal states moderated the effects of feedback on pride and shame at a within-person level. These results suggest coaches and teachers may be able to use contextual cues to influence motivation and selfconscious emotions of their athletes and students during competence pursuits.

History

Volume

2

Issue

4

Start Page

233

End Page

249

Number of Pages

17

eISSN

2157-3913

ISSN

2157-3905

Location

United States

Publisher

American Psychological Association

Language

en-aus

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

Institute for Health and Social Science Research (IHSSR); Pennsylvania State University; School of Human, Health and Social Sciences (2013- );

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Sport, exercise, and performance psychology.

Exports