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Experiences of colorectal cancer patients in the 2-years post-diagnosis and patient factors predicting poor outcome

journal contribution
posted on 23.02.2018, 00:00 by CL Paul, E Cameron, Christopher DoranChristopher Doran, D Hill, F Macrae, ML Carey, RW Sanson-Fisher
© 2016, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Purpose: There are few recent longitudinal studies investigating the quality of life of colorectal cancer patients in the early years following diagnosis. This study aimed to (i) compare the health status of people with colorectal cancer less than 1 year from diagnosis with health status 1 year later and (ii) determine the characteristics associated with a change in overall health status. Methods: The study was conducted as part of a larger trial. Participants (n = 539) were identified via the Victorian Cancer Registry in Australia, completed a computer-assisted baseline telephone interview (including the EQ-5D-3L) within 6–12 months of diagnosis, and mailed a survey 12 months later. Results: At baseline, the majority of participants (55 %) reported some problems, including difficulties in usual activities (26 %), pain or discomfort (25 %), anxiety or depression (23 %) and mobility issues (15 %). Sixty-nine percent had either an unchanged or increased health utility score from baseline to follow-up. The largest proportion reporting an increase in problems between baseline and follow-up related to pain or discomfort (18 %). While visual analogue scale scores indicated a significantly improved health state over time overall, 32 % reported a decreased health utility score from baseline to follow-up. Those aged over 80 years were more likely to report a decreased health utility score compared to 60–80-year-olds. Conclusions: A sizeable minority of patients experience ongoing problems in their daily lives and should be offered assistance in overcoming disabilities and returning to best possible functioning, particularly older patients who appear to be vulnerable to poor outcomes.

Funding

Category 1 - Australian Competitive Grants (this includes ARC, NHMRC)

History

Volume

24

Issue

12

Start Page

4921

End Page

4928

Number of Pages

8

eISSN

1433-7339

ISSN

0941-4355

Publisher

Springer

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

University of Newcastle; Hunter Medical Research Institute; University of Melbourne; Cancer Council Victoria; The Royal Melbourne Hospital

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Supportive Care in Cancer