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Examining commute routes : applications of GIS and GPS technology

journal contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 by H Badland, Mitchell DuncanMitchell Duncan, M Oliver, J Duncan, S Mavoa
Objective: The application of geographic information systems (GIS) to describe commute route elements is commonplace, yet the accuracy of GIS-estimated commute routes is not clear. This study compared GIS-estimated commute routes against actual routes traveled as measured using global positioning systems (GPS) to examine differences in urban form surrounding travel routes across different buffer sizes and travel modes. Methods: Thirty-seven adults from Auckland, New Zealand participated in the study between January and March 2008. Participants wore GPS units and completed a travel log for 7 days. GPS data were integrated into a GIS database to ascertain commute routes. Results: Overall, 29 commute journeys were appropriately captured by GPS. Levels of agreement between actual and shortest commute routes were dependent on the buffer size selected, built environment variable examined, and travel mode. Conclusions: Despite technical difficulties, GPS assessment of routes traveled is recommended to provide an accurate assessment of commute journey urban form elements.

Funding

Category 1 - Australian Competitive Grants (this includes ARC, NHMRC)

History

Volume

15

Start Page

327

End Page

330

Number of Pages

4

ISSN

1342-078X

Location

Japan

Publisher

Springer Japan KK

Language

en-aus

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research; Centre for Social and Health Outcomes Research and Evaluation; Institute for Health and Social Science Research (IHSSR);

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Environmental health and preventive medicine.