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Enteric pathogens of food sellers in rural Gambia with incidental finding of Myxobolus species (Protozoa: Myxozoa).

journal contribution
posted on 28.06.2018, 00:00 authored by Richard BradburyRichard Bradbury, B Barbé, J Jacobs, AT Jallow, KC Camara, M Colley, R Wegmüller, B Jassey, Y Cham, I Baldeh
BACKGROUND: Ongoing surveillance of enteric pathogens of public health significance among casual food sellers is undertaken in many resource-limited countries. We report the results of a survey in Kiang West province, The Gambia, and provide an exemplar methodology for such surveys in resource-limited laboratories. METHODS: Unpreserved, unrefrigerated stool samples were subjected to Salmonella, Shigella and agar plate culture for rhabditoid nematodes. Direct microscopy, formalin-ethyl acetate concentration and iron-hematoxylin staining was performed later, following preservation. RESULTS: Of 128 specimens received, no Shigella spp. was recovered, while four serovars of non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica, including Chandans, were isolated. Pathogenic parasitic infections were Necator americanus 10/128 (7.8%), Strongyloides stercoralis 3/128 (2.8%), Blastocystis species 45/128 (35.1%), Entamoeba histolytica complex 19/128 (14.8%) and Giardia intestinalis 4/128 (3.1%). A single case each of Hymenolepis diminuta and S. mansoni infection were detected. In one participant, myxozoan spores identical to those of Myxobolus species were found. CONCLUSIONS: Rare parasitoses and serovars of Salmonella enterica may occur relatively commonly in rural Africa. This paper describes intestinal pathogens found in a cohort of food sellers in such a setting. Furthermore, it describes two parasites rarely recovered from humans and demonstrates the need for methods other than microscopy to detect S. stercoralis infections.

Funding

Other

History

Volume

109

Issue

5

Start Page

334

End Page

339

Number of Pages

6

eISSN

1878-3503

ISSN

0035-9203

Location

England

Publisher

Oxford University Press (OUP)

Language

eng

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

Acceptance Date

16/02/2015

External Author Affiliations

MRC The Gambia, Institserovarute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp; University of Leuven, Belgium; London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Transactions of The Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene