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Engaging pet owners in disaster risk and preparedness communications : simplifying complex human–animal relations with archetypes

journal contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 by Joshua Trigg, Kirrilly ThompsonKirrilly Thompson, Bradley SmithBradley Smith, P Bennett
The influence of human–animal relationships upon owners’ perceptions and behaviours can lead to situations that place owners and animals at risk of harm. Pet ownership particularly is considered a risk factor for unsafe responses to natural hazards, though conversely, it can also be viewed as a protective factor that motivates disaster preparedness. However, each relationship should not be treated equivalently, as characteristics considered most meaningful within them differ across various types of pet–owner relationship and along multiple dimensions. A one-size-fits-all approach to applying the pets-as-protective-factor principle is then too broad in scope. This review outlines a novel psychographic profiling approach for archetypes of pet–owner relationship characteristics as a means of describing risk-preparedness foci and risk propensities within disaster contexts. Understanding those differences as detailed archetypes can help emergency services more effectively target pet owners through reframing disaster risk and preparedness communications in relation to prominent characteristics of relationship archetypes. We argue that this approach can improve the effectiveness of risk and preparedness communications by increasing pet owners’ receptivity to, and cognitive involvement with, message content.

History

Volume

14

Issue

3

Start Page

236

End Page

251

Number of Pages

16

eISSN

1878-0059

ISSN

1747-7891

Location

UK

Publisher

Earthscan

Language

en-aus

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

Appleton Institute for Behavioural Sciences; Appleton Institute for Behavioural Sciences; La Trobe University;

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Environmental hazards.