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Engaging creativity through an action learning and action research process to develop an Indigenous art exhibition

journal contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 by Bronwyn Fredericks, P CroftWarcon, K Butler, H Butler, Pamela Croft
In most art exhibitions, the creative part of the exhibition is assumed to be the artworks on display. But for the Capricornia Arts Mob's first collective art exhibition in Rockhampton during NAIDOC Week in 2012, the process of developing the exhibition became the focus of creative action learning and action research. In working together to produce a multimedia exhibition, we learned about the collaborative processes and time required to develop a combined exhibition. We applied Indigenous ways of working - including yarning, cultural respect, cultural protocols, mentoring young people, providing a culturally safe working environment and sharing both time and food - to develop our first collective art exhibition. We developed a process that allowed us to ask deep questions, engage in a jount journey of learning, and develop our collective story. This paper explores the processes that the Capricornia Arts Mob used to develop the exhibition for NAIDOC 2012.

History

Volume

20

Issue

1

Start Page

14

End Page

34

Number of Pages

21

ISSN

1326-964X

Location

Australia

Publisher

ALAR Association

Language

en-aus

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

Cultural Warning

This research output may contain the names and images of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people now deceased. We apologize for any distress that may occur.

External Author Affiliations

Capricorn Arts Mob; KIMA Consultant; Not affiliated to a Research Institute; Office of Indigenous Engagement;

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Action learning and action research journal.

Exports