File(s) not publicly available

Empires of information

journal contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 by Alan Knight, Robert Robertson
The international War on Terror and recent events in our immediate region, particularly Indonesia, have thrown a sudden spotlight on Australian reporting of the Asia Pacific. But Australia has a long history of journalism, travel writing and documentary filmmaking here. This paper draws on Edward Said’s writings on ‘orientalism’ to bring an historical perspective to bear on contemporary factual genres and practices. It highlights three cases, focusing on Indonesia and Papua New Guinea: the travel writing and journalism of Frank Clune in the late thirties and early forties (To the Isles of Spice, 1944), the agit-prop filmmaking of Joris Ivens and the Waterside Workers Federation (Indonesia Calling, 1948), and the explosion of documentary work that came out of Papua New Guinea, Australia’s only true colony, from the early 1970s. In conclusion, the paper offers a caveat to factual crafts and genres — in both journalism and filmmaking — that deal with these geographically close, but culturally ‘other’, Australian neighbours, whom we must learn to live with. Empires of information are always, simultaneously, empires of imagination.

Funding

Category 1 - Australian Competitive Grants (this includes ARC, NHMRC)

History

Volume

2

Issue

3

Start Page

1

End Page

15

Number of Pages

15

ISSN

1550-7521

Location

USA

Publisher

Purdue University, Calumet

Language

en-aus

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

Faculty of Informatics and Communication;

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Global media journal.

Usage metrics

CQUniversity

Categories

Keywords

Exports