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Emotional regulation training for intensive and critical care nurses

journal contribution
posted on 06.09.2021, 23:36 by Hamid Kharatzadeh, Mousa Alavi, Abolfazi Mohammadi, Denis Visentin, Michelle L Cleary
Professional quality of life is related to psychological well-being for nurses with implications for quality patient care. This study evaluated the effectiveness of emotional regulation training on depression, anxiety and stress, and professional quality of life for intensive and critical care nurses. In this experimental comparison trial, 60 intensive and critical care nurses were randomly assigned to treatment and wait-list control groups. The treatment group received six sessions of emotional regulation training, while the wait-list control group received no treatment. Outcome measures were: the Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire; the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale; and the Professional Quality of Life Scale in a pre-post design. The treatment group demonstrated greater improvements in burnout and compassion satisfaction compared with the wait-list control group. No significant reduction in compassion fatigue was found compared with controls. Some cognitive coping strategies improved in the treatment group compared with controls, with greater reductions in depression, anxiety, and stress. This study indicates the benefits of implementing emotional regulation training programs to improve psychological well-being and professional quality of life for intensive and critical care nurses.

History

Volume

22

Issue

2

Start Page

445

End Page

453

Number of Pages

9

eISSN

1442-2018

ISSN

1441-0745

Location

Australia

Publisher

Wiley-Blackwell

Language

eng

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

Acceptance Date

02/12/2019

External Author Affiliations

Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Shahed University, Iran; University of Tasmania

Era Eligible

Yes

Medium

Print-Electronic

Journal

Nursing and Health Sciences