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Educational considerations for health professionals to effectively work with clients with complex regional pain syndrome OACL.pdf (549.22 kB)

Educational considerations for health professionals to effectively work with clients with complex regional pain syndrome

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journal contribution
posted on 2023-12-21, 05:20 authored by Colleen Johnston-DevinColleen Johnston-Devin, Florin Oprescu, Marianne Wallis, Marion Gray
Introduction People living with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), a rare chronic pain disorder, must become experts in their own self-management. Listening to the voice of the patient is often advocated in the pain literature. However, the patient’s option is rarely asked for or considered by clinicians, even when they live with a condition that health professionals have rarely heard of. Purpose To explore what people living with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) think health professionals should know about their condition to provide appropriate care. Design A heuristic, hermeneutic phenomenological study was conducted asking people about their experiences living with CRPS. This paper reports on the findings of an additional question asked of all participants. Participants Seventeen people living with complex regional pain syndrome were interviewed. Findings Overwhelmingly, participants felt that health professionals do not know enough about CRPS, or chronic pain and believe their health outcomes are affected by this lack of knowledge. Sub-themes identified were don’t touch unless I say it is okay; be patient with the patient/ it is important to develop a relationship; educate yourself and educate the patient; choose your words carefully and refer to others as needed. An additional theme, it is very hard to describe CRPS was also identified. Conclusions Including patients as a member of the healthcare team is recommended to help people take control and self-manage their pain. For true patient centered care to be achieved, health professionals must accept and respect patients’ descriptions of pain and their pain experience. This may require additional health professional education at both undergraduate and post-graduate levels in pain and communication to increase their bedside manner and therapeutic communication to deliver care in partnership with the patient.

History

Volume

17

Issue

6

Start Page

1

End Page

16

Number of Pages

16

eISSN

1932-6203

ISSN

1932-6203

Publisher

Public Library of Science (PLoS)

Publisher License

CC BY

Additional Rights

CC-BY

Language

en

Peer Reviewed

  • Yes

Open Access

  • Yes

Acceptance Date

2022-05-18

External Author Affiliations

University of the Sunshine Coast; Southern Cross University; University of Southern Queensland

Era Eligible

  • Yes

Medium

Electronic-eCollection

Journal

PLOS ONE

Article Number

e0269337