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Do personally tailored videos in a web-based physical activity intervention lead to higher attention and recall? : An eye-tracking study

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Over half of the Australian population does not meet physical activity guidelines and has an increased risk of chronic disease. Web-based physical activity interventions have the potential to reach large numbers of the population at low-cost, however issues have been identified with usage and participant retention. Personalized (computer-tailored) physical activity advice delivered through video has the potential to address low engagement, howeverit is unclear whether it is more effective in engaging participants when compared to text-delivered personalized advice. This study compared the attention and recall outcomes of tailored physical activity advice in video- vs. text-format. Participants (n D41) were randomly assigned to receive either video- or text-tailored feedback with identical content. Outcome measures included attention to the feedback, measured through advanced eye-tracking technology (TobiiX 120), and recall of the advice, measured through a post intervention interview. Between group ANOVA’s, Mann-Whitney U tests and chi square analyses were applied. Participants in the video-group displayed greater attention to the physical activity feedback in terms of gaze-duration on the feedback (7.7 vs. 3.6 min,p <001), total fixation-duration on the feedback (6.0 vs. 3.3 min, p <001), and focusing on feedback (6.8 vs. 3.5 min, p <001). Despite both groups having the same ability to navigate through the feedback, the video-group completed a significantly (p <0.001) higher percentage of feedback sections (95%) compared to the text-group (66%). The main messages were recalled in both groups, but many details were forgotten. No significant between group differences were found for message recall. These results suggest that video-tailored feedback leads to greater attention compared to text-tailored feedback. More research is needed to determine how message recall can be improved, and whether video-tailored advice can lead to greater health behavior change.

Funding

Category 3 - Industry and Other Research Income

History

Volume

2

Issue

13

Start Page

1

End Page

7

Number of Pages

7

ISSN

2296-2565

Location

Switzerland

Publisher

Frontiers Research Foundation

Language

en-aus

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

Yes

External Author Affiliations

Institute for Health and Social Science Research (IHSSR); Learning and Teaching Education Research Centre, Central Queensland University, Noosa, QLD, Australia; School of Human, Health and Social Sciences (2013- ); University of Alberta; University of Newcastle;

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Frontiers in public health.

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