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Do neglected Australian arboviruses pose a global epidemic threat?

journal contribution
posted on 19.07.2018, 00:00 authored by Narayan GyawaliNarayan Gyawali, Richard BradburyRichard Bradbury, Andrew Taylor-Robinson
Arboviruses (Arbo: ARthropod BOrne) remain a concern for public health in Australia. They are transmitted between their vertebrate hosts by arthropods (mosquitoes, ticks, sandflies and midges). Although more than 75 arboviruses have been identified in Australia, for most there is no information as to whether they infect or cause disease in people.1 Clinically, the most important Australian arboviruses are Ross River, Barmah Forest, Murray Valley encephalitis and West Nile (Kunjin strain).2 However, several other arboviruses that are indigenous to Australia also infect humans, including notably Kokobera, Stratford, Alfuy and Edge Hill virus.2

History

Volume

40

Issue

6

Start Page

596

End Page

596

Number of Pages

1

eISSN

1753-6405

ISSN

1326-0200

Publisher

Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia

Additional Rights

Creative Commons Attribution License

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

Yes

Era Eligible

No

Journal

Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health