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Differences in physical activity between weekdays and weekend days among U.S. children and adults_ Cross-sectional analysis of NHANES 2011–2014 data.pdf (742.82 kB)

Differences in physical activity between weekdays and weekend days among U.S. children and adults: Cross-sectional analysis of NHANES 2011–2014 data

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Version 2 2022-08-30, 03:58
Version 1 2022-08-29, 23:07
journal contribution
posted on 2022-08-30, 03:58 authored by Quyen G To, Robert StantonRobert Stanton, Stephanie SchoeppeStephanie Schoeppe, Thomas DoeringThomas Doering, Corneel VandelanotteCorneel Vandelanotte
This study investigates differences in physical activity between weekdays and weekend days, and its associations with sociodemographic and anthropometric characteristics in the U.S population using the NHANES 2011–2014 data. Physical activity was measured using ActiGraph GT3X+. Raw acceleration data were converted to Monitor-Independent Movement Summary units (MIMS-units) that account for inter-device variability and eliminates non-human movement. The daily MIMS-units were averaged for weekdays and weekend days. Demographic characteristics were self-reported. Height and weight were objectively measured. The sample included 6611 adults aged ≥ 20 years and 3520 children aged between 6 and 19 years. The results show that more MIMS-units were registered on weekdays compared to weekend days for adults (652, 95%CI = 533, 770) and children (889, 95%CI = 702, 1076). Factors associated with physical activity in adults (gender, age, marital status, ethnicity, education level, and weight status) were similar for weekdays and weekend days. In children, physical activity was associated with ethnicity, weight status, and age. The level of differences in physical activity between weekdays and weekend days among adults was larger for men, Hispanic Americans, and those with lower education levels. Differences among children were similar across subgroups, except for those aged 16–19 years who had smaller level of difference compared to those aged 12–15 years. In conclusion, adults and children were more active on weekdays than weekend days. The effects of structured days (i.e., weekdays) on physical activity appeared to be similar across most child subgroups but more heterogeneous for adult subgroups. Interventions increasing physical activity opportunities during weekend days are warranted.

History

Volume

28

Start Page

1

End Page

8

Number of Pages

8

eISSN

2211-3355

ISSN

2211-3355

Publisher

Elsevier

Additional Rights

CC BY 4.0

Language

en

Peer Reviewed

  • Yes

Open Access

  • Yes

Acceptance Date

2022-07-01

Author Research Institute

  • Appleton Institute

Era Eligible

  • Yes

Journal

Preventive Medicine Reports

Article Number

101892