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Developmental lessons from the Capricornia Arts Mob (CAM)

journal contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 by Bronwyn Fredericks, P CroftWarcon, K Butler, H Butler, Pamela Croft
The Capricornia Arts Mob (CAM) is a collective of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander visual artists, sculptors, photographers, carvers and writers based in the Rockhampton region of Central Queensland. This paper explores the early development of CAM, identifies some of the lessons its members have learned about working together, and considers its role as a regional artists’ collective. The authors identify that traditional Indigenous practices, such as yarning and the sharing of food, have helped to facilitate the emergence of CAM as a vibrant, challenging, eclectic artistic family. They recognise the cultural challenges faced by the collective – including finding a culturally appropriate place to meet and work, and the cross-cultural issues that can emerge within Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander groups. In just 18 months, CAM has held successful exhibitions and developed public artworks. It is a strong part of regional Queensland’s arts scene, which supports emerging artists and provides a space to celebrate and support Indigenous art.

History

Volume

11

Issue

3

Start Page

15

End Page

19

Number of Pages

5

ISSN

1448-0336

Location

Auburn, VIC

Language

en-aus

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

Cultural Warning

This research output may contain the names and images of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people now deceased. We apologize for any distress that may occur.

External Author Affiliations

KIMA Consultant; Learning and Teaching Education Research Centre (LTERC); Office of Indigenous Engagement;

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

New Community Quarterly

Exports