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Democratization of coastal zone decision-making for Indigenous Australians : Insights from stakeholder analysis

journal contribution
posted on 22.12.2021, 01:17 by Susan RockloffSusan Rockloff, Stewart LockieStewart Lockie
Community participation has become something of an orthodoxy within natural resource management. In the absence of an explicit strategy for democratization and capacity-building the notion of community participation is potentially meaningless and its application likely to mask decisions made in the interests of elite groups. This article examines the shortcomings of participatory processes in coastal resource management and seeks to identify and overcome constraints to democratization and capacity-building for Indigenous Australians. Using two coastal catchments in Central Queensland as a case study, we explore relations of power among stakeholders using Stakeholder Analysis to provide a platform for more effective deliberative participation by this group of stakeholders. Discussion of the specific barriers to participation identified by Aboriginal stakeholders will demonstrate the need to adopt notions of capacity-building that focus not only on the attributes of the individual stakeholder that might facilitate their participation, but on the characteristics also of the decision-making environment.

Funding

Category 1 - Australian Competitive Grants (this includes ARC, NHMRC)

History

Volume

34

Issue

3

Start Page

251

End Page

266

Number of Pages

16

eISSN

1521-0421

ISSN

0892-0753

Location

London, UK

Publisher

Taylor and Francis

Language

en-aus

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

Cultural Warning

This research output may contain the names and images of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people now deceased. We apologize for any distress that may occur.

External Author Affiliations

Centre for Social Science Research; TBA Research Institute;

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Coastal management.