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Creativity : cognitive, social and cultural perspectives : [Editorial]

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journal contribution
posted on 2017-12-06, 00:00 authored by N McLoughlin, Donna BrienDonna Brien
Historically, the study of creativity has been undertaken from a great many perspectives. These include practice-based enquiry into the creative arts, studies of the creative process using auto-ethnographic methods, studies of creative individuals to investigate and outline creative traits, research which identifies the conditions which promote and inhibit creativity, creativity as a socio-cultural process, creativity as a cognitive process and the neuropsychology of creativity. In recent years, the term ‘creativity’ has become a buzzword in practically every sector of public life and many who teach and research within the creative disciplines in higher education have become increasingly sensitive to the rise of the terms ‘creative’ and ‘creativity’ as important and overarching themes within our universities. As both a concept and as a term, creativity has far-reaching appeal but, with this currency and popularity, there is a danger that the term’s very meaning may become eroded. With this in mind, this special issue of TEXT offers an opportunity to refocus on creativity as a concept and a process. It also reflects a conscious effort to reclaim creativity and the creative process as something worthy of study, research and academic attention both within the creative arts disciplines and outside; through investigations in reflective practice and through interdisciplinary engagement with the crossing points offered by other disciplines which afford new perspectives on the study of creativity within those arts.

History

Volume

16

Issue

1

Start Page

1

End Page

3

Number of Pages

3

ISSN

1327-9556

Location

Canberra

Publisher

Australasian Association of Writing Programs

Language

en-aus

Peer Reviewed

  • No

Open Access

  • No

External Author Affiliations

Faculty of Arts, Business, Informatics and Education; TBA Research Institute; University of Gloucestershire;

Era Eligible

  • No

Journal

Text.

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