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Consumption of a smoothie or cereal-based breakfast: Impact on thirst, hunger, appetite and subsequent dietary intake

journal contribution
posted on 30.04.2021, 02:35 by Courtney Myers, Danielle McCartney, Ben Desbrow, Saman KhalesiSaman Khalesi, Christopher Irwin
Smoothies are a popular breakfast option. However, liquids may evoke weaker satiation than nutritionally comparable semi-solid and solid foods. This study examined consumption of cereal and milk (CM) or a nutritionally comparable fruit smoothie (FS) for breakfast on subsequent dietary behaviours, in a controlled laboratory setting. Twenty-five participants (age 25 ± 6 y) completed three trials, receiving either CM or FS for breakfast. Afterwards, participants remained isolated for 4 h with ad libitum access to foods/beverages. A repeat trial (CM or FS) allowed exploration of normal variability. Post-breakfast energy intake (EI) (CM = 1465(2436) vs. FS = 1787(3190) kJ, Median (IQR), p = 0.099), time to intake of next food/fluid (meal latency) (CM = 146(97) vs. FS = 180(100) min, p = 0.127), and subjective hunger, desire to eat, fullness and thirst ratings were similar between conditions (p’s > 0.05). The mean coefficient of variation for EI and meal latency were 41% and 21%, respectively. Consumption of a FS does not negatively impact acute EI and meal latency.

History

Volume

72

Issue

1

Start Page

123

End Page

133

Number of Pages

11

eISSN

1465-3478

ISSN

0963-7486

Location

England

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

Language

eng

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

Acceptance Date

06/05/2020

External Author Affiliations

Griffith University; University of Sydney

Author Research Institute

Appleton Institute

Era Eligible

Yes

Medium

Print-Electronic

Journal

International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition