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Constructing places for the market : the case of Newcastle, NSW

journal contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 by Hilary WinchesterHilary Winchester, P McGuirk, K Dunn
Cities with a heritage of heavy industry, such as Newcastle (NSW), face an insecure future as they undergo economic restructuring. The identities of cities are being refashioned by entrepreneurial urban governments, as part of a three‐pronged attempt to market their territories. A social construction approach reveals the problematic nature of these symbolic reconstructions, their partiality, the reduction of heritage to a commodity, and the eliding of socio‐economic disadvantage. The new post‐industrial identity for Newcastle disinherits working people, ignores the local indigenous peoples, and trivialises the role of women. The richly layered urban landscape and historically constructed narratives – the local heritage – have been cynically appropriated and transformed for the purposes of place marketing. The rhetoric of post‐industrialism conceals poverty and alienation, and the associated physical restructurings are displacing service‐dependent populations.

History

Volume

2

Issue

1-2

Start Page

41

End Page

58

Number of Pages

18

eISSN

1470-3610

ISSN

1352-7258

Location

United Kingdom

Publisher

Routledge

Language

en-aus

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

University of New South Wales; University of Newcastle;

Era Eligible

No

Journal

International journal of heritage studies.