cqu_7187+SOURCE1+SOURCE1.2.pdf (225.91 kB)
Download file

Conflict between international treaties : failing to mitigate the effects of introduced marine species

Download (225.91 kB)
journal contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 authored by Marnie CampbellMarnie Campbell, A Grage, C Mabin, Chad HewittChad Hewitt
This paper examines how humans have impacted upon the marine environment through the introduction of species beyond their native ranges. Introduced species impact upon native biodiversity, spread diseases and pathogens, and have had economic and social impacts in their ‘new’ ecosystems. Because of the range and extent of introduced species impacts, numerous methods to mitigate the effects of introduced species have been developed and implemented. Within this paper we will examine how two international legal instruments, the Convention on Biological Diversity, 1992 (CBD) and the World Trade Organization’s General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade 1994 (GATT), in particular its associated Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (SPS), deal with introduced species. In this context, the paper focuses on the potential for conflict that may arise with the application of these international legal instruments, thus causing a failure to effectively mitigate for the effects of introduced species.

History

Volume

28

Issue

1

Start Page

46

End Page

56

Number of Pages

11

ISSN

1441-8460

Location

Australia

Publisher

Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia

Language

en-aus

Peer Reviewed

No

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

Australian Maritime College;

Era Eligible

No

Journal

Dialogue.