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Cleaner shrimp are a sustainable option to treat parasitic disease in farmed fish

journal contribution
posted on 16.12.2019, 00:00 authored by David VaughanDavid Vaughan, AS Grutter, KS Hutson
Chemical use is widespread in aquaculture to treat parasitic diseases in farmed fish. Cleaner fish biocontrols are increasingly used in fish farming as an alternative to medicines. However, cleaner fish are susceptible to some of their clients' parasites and their supply is largely dependent on wild harvest. In comparison, cleaner shrimp are not susceptible to fish ectoparasites and they can be reliably bred in captivity. The effectiveness of shrimp in reducing parasites on farmed fish remained unexplored until now. We tested four cleaner shrimp species for their ability to reduce three harmful parasites (a monogenean fluke, a ciliate protozoan, and a leech) on a farmed grouper. All shrimp reduced parasites on fish and most reduced the free-living early-life environmental stages - a function not provided by cleaner fish. Cleaner shrimp are sustainable biocontrol candidates against parasites of farmed fish, with the peppermint cleaner shrimp reducing parasites by up to 98%.

Funding

Other

History

Volume

8

Issue

1

Start Page

1

End Page

10

Number of Pages

10

ISSN

2045-2322

Location

England

Publisher

Nature Research (part of Springer Nature)

Additional Rights

CC BY

Language

eng

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

Yes

Acceptance Date

31/08/2018

External Author Affiliations

University of Queensland; James Cook University

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Scientific Reports