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Characterisation of the intestinal microbiota of commercially farmed saltwater crocodiles, Crocodylus porosus

journal contribution
posted on 04.05.2020, 00:00 authored by N-L Willson, TTH Van, J Lever, RJ Moore, Dragana StanleyDragana Stanley
The Australian saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus) industry began commercially in the 1980s, producing skins for export and crocodile meat as a by-product. Industry research has thus far focused on strategies to improve production efficiency. In the current study, we utilised 16S rRNA sequencing to characterise the intestinal microbiome of Australian saltwater crocodiles. Samples were collected from 13 commercially farmed crocodiles from six sample sites along the length of the intestinal tract. The results indicate a similar microbiome composition to that found in the freshwater alligator, with the dominate phyla represented by Firmicutes, primarily Clostridia, and Fusobacteria, which appears to be distinct from mammalian, fish, and other reptile phyla which are generally dominated by Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes. The high abundance of ‘pathogenic’ bacteria, with no apparent consequence to the host’s health, is of great interest and warrants further additional investigation. This will enable expansion of the current understanding of host immune function and how it is modified by host and intestinal microbiome interactions. © 2019, Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature.

History

Volume

103

Issue

21

Start Page

8977

End Page

8985

Number of Pages

9

eISSN

1432-0614

ISSN

0175-7598

Publisher

Springer

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

Acceptance Date

17/09/2019

External Author Affiliations

The University of Adelaide; Koorana Crocodile Farm, Qld.; RMIT University

Author Research Institute

Institute for Future Farming Systems

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology