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Changes in structural aspects of mood during 39-66h of sleep loss using matched controls

journal contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 authored by Jessica PatersonJessica Paterson, J Dorrian, N Lamond, P Murphy, Sally FergusonSally Ferguson, Sarah Jay, S Campbell, Drew DawsonDrew Dawson
A number of studies have described mood change during sleep loss in the laboratory, however, an understanding of fluctuations in structural aspects of mood under such conditions is lacking. Sixty-two healthy young adults completed one of three possible conditions: one (n ¼ 20) or two (n ¼ 23) nights of sleep loss or the control condition which consisted of one (n ¼ 9) or two (n ¼ 10) nights of 9 h time in bed. The Mood Scale II was completed every two waking hours and data were analysed in terms of the frequency and intensity of mood reports. Overall, sleep loss conditions were associated with significantly less frequent happiness and activation and more frequent fatigue reports (p < 0.001). Intensity was also significantly reduced for activation and happiness, and increased for depression, anger and fatigue (p < 0.05). Interestingly, there were no significant differences in anger following two nights in the laboratory with or without sleep. Further, two nights in the lab with normal sleep was associated with significant increases in depression intensity (p < 0.05). Findings support the hypothesis of a mood regulatory function of sleep and highlight the relative independence of frequency and intensity and of positive and negative mood dimensions. Findings also suggest that the laboratory environment, in the absence of sleep loss, may have a significant negative impact on mood.

Funding

Category 1 - Australian Competitive Grants (this includes ARC, NHMRC)

History

Volume

42

Start Page

196

End Page

201

Number of Pages

6

ISSN

0003-6870

Location

United Kingdom

Publisher

Elsevier

Language

en-aus

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

Centre for Sleep Research;

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Applied ergonomics : human factors in technology and society.