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Celebrated executioner[s]': Shakespearean oratory and space in mid-nineteenth-century colonial Australia

journal contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 by Nicole Anae
Examining Australian colonial re-readings of Shakespearean texts outside the formal realm of theatre productions offers a fascinating insight into the multiplicity of Victorian revisions and responses to Shakespeare as a literary form throughout the 1850s and 1860s. The growth of dramatic readings in non-purpose-built venues during the period represents an alteration of form significantly affecting colonialculture and the spaces and conditions in which alterations of form took place.Aside from purpose-built venues, other public spaces used for dramatic readingsof Shakespearean texts included annexed rooms built on to, or adjacent to, publichouses and saloons, town halls, court houses, showground buildings, schools,Masonic halls, and occasionally – albeit rarely – churches. This article has two aims:to explore the variety of the non-purpose-built social spaces in which re-readings ofShakespearean texts occurred during the mid-nineteenth century; and to examinethe social and cultural shifts in attitudes to both the space, and Shakespearean texts,which such re-readings motivated.

History

Volume

60

Start Page

83

End Page

101

Number of Pages

19

ISSN

0810-4123

Location

Australia

Publisher

Australasian Drama Studies

Language

en-aus

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

Not affiliated to a Research Institute; University of the South Pacific;

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Australasian Drama Studies

Exports