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Can a print-based intervention increase screening for first degree relatives of people with colorectal cancer? A randomised controlled trial

journal contribution
posted on 23.02.2018, 00:00 by M Carey, R Sanson-Fisher, F Macrae, E Cameron, D Hill, C D'Este, J Simmons, Christopher DoranChristopher Doran
Objective: To test the effectiveness of a targeted print-based intervention to improve screening adherence in first degree relatives of people with colorectal cancer (CRC). Methods: People with CRC and their adult first degree relatives were identified through a population-based cancer registry and randomly allocated as a family unit to the intervention or control condition. The control group received general information about CRC screening. The intervention group received printed advice regarding screening that was targeted to their risk level. Screening adherence was assessed at baseline and at 12 months via self report. Results: 752 (25%) index cases and 574 (34%) eligible first degree relatives consented to take part in the trial and completed baseline interviews. At 12 months, 58% of first degree relatives in the control group and 61% in the intervention group were adherent to screening guidelines (mixed effects logistic regression group by time interaction effect =2.7; 95%CI=1.2–5.9; P=0.013). Subgroup analysis indicated that the intervention was only effective for those with the lowest risk. Conclusions: Provision of personalised risk information may have a modest effect on adherence to CRC screening recommendations among first degree relatives of people diagnosed with CRC. Implications: Improved strategies for identifying and engaging first degree relatives are needed to maximise the population impact of the intervention. © 2016 The Authors

Funding

Category 1 - Australian Competitive Grants (this includes ARC, NHMRC)

History

Volume

40

Issue

6

Start Page

582

End Page

587

Number of Pages

6

eISSN

1753-6405

ISSN

1326-0200

Publisher

Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia, Australia

Additional Rights

BY-NC-ND (Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives)

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

Yes

External Author Affiliations

University of Newcastle; Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI), New South Wales; University of Melbourne; Cancer Council Victoria; The Royal Melbourne Hospital; Australian National University;

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health