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Burnout and work engagement in occupational therapists

journal contribution
posted on 2018-08-10, 00:00 authored by AA Poulsen, Pamela Meredith, A Khan, J Henderson, V Castrisos, SR Khan
Introduction:Work engagement, characterized by vigour, dedication, and absorption, is often perceived as the opposite of burnout. Occupational therapists with burnout feel exhausted and disengaged from their work. This study aims to investigate demographic and work-related psychosocial factors associated with burnout and work engagement. Method: A cross-sectional postal survey of 951 occupational therapists was conducted. Findings: Two models representing factors associated with burnout (F(15,871) = 28.01, p < .001) and work engagement (F(10,852) = 16.15, p < .001) accounted for 32.54% and 15.93% of the variance respectively. Burnout and work engagement were inversely associated (2(n = 941) = 55.16, p < .001). Conclusion: Factors associated with burnout and work engagement were identified. The variables associated with burnout included: low psychological detachment from work during out-of-work hours, low income satisfaction, perceived work overload, difficulty saying 'no', < 10 years' experience, low frequency of having a 'belly laugh', and not having children. High levels of work engagement were reported by therapists with the following: low psychological detachment from work, high income satisfaction, postgraduate qualifications, > 40 hours work/week, high frequency of having a 'belly laugh', and having children. Understanding the factors associated with burnout and work engagement provides prerequisite information to inform strategies aimed at building healthy workforces. © The College of Occupational Therapists Ltd.

Funding

Category 2 - Other Public Sector Grants Category

History

Volume

77

Issue

3

Start Page

156

End Page

164

Number of Pages

9

eISSN

1477-6006

ISSN

0308-0226

Publisher

Sage Publications, UK

Peer Reviewed

  • Yes

Open Access

  • No

External Author Affiliations

University of Queensland; Occupational Therapy for Children Private Practice; Association for Preschool Education of Deaf Children Inc.

Era Eligible

  • Yes

Journal

British Journal of Occupational Therapy

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