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Are there distinctive outcomes from self-exclusion? An exploratory study comparing gamblers who have self-excluded, received counselling, or both

journal contribution
posted on 21.12.2017, 00:00 by Nerilee Hing, Alexander Russell, B Tolchard, E Nuske
© 2015, Springer Science+Business Media New York.Research has not determined whether typical improvements in psychosocial functioning following self-exclusion are due to the intervention. This study aimed to explore distinctive outcomes from self-exclusion by assessing outcomes between 1) self-excluders who had and had not received gambling counselling and 2) self-excluders compared to non-self-excluders who had received gambling counselling. A longitudinal design administered three assessments on gambling behaviour, problem gambling severity, gambling urge, alcoholism, general health, and harmful consequences. Of the 86 participants at Time 1 with similar baseline scores, 59.3 % completed all assessments. By Time 2, all groups (self-excluded only, self-excluded plus counselling, counselling only) had vastly improved on most outcome measures. Improvements were sustained at Time 3. Outcomes did not differ for self-exclusion combined with counselling. Compared to non-excluders, more self-excluders abstained from most problematic gambling form and fewer had harmful consequences. Findings suggest self-exclusion may have similar short-term outcomes to counselling alone and may reduce harm in the short-term.

Funding

Category 2 - Other Public Sector Grants Category

History

Volume

13

Issue

4

Start Page

481

End Page

496

Number of Pages

16

eISSN

1557-1882

ISSN

1557-1874

Publisher

Sage Publications Ltd.

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

Southern Cross University; University of New England

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction

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