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Are psychology university student gamblers representative of non-university students and general gamblers - A comparative analysis CQU.pdf (338.76 kB)

Are psychology university student gamblers representative of non-university students and general gamblers? A comparative analysis

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Version 2 2023-03-20, 01:38
Version 1 2021-01-14, 12:53
journal contribution
posted on 2023-03-20, 01:38 authored by SM Gainsbury, Alexander RussellAlexander Russell, A Blaszczynski
Students recruited from psychology undergraduate university populations are commonly used in psychology research, including gambling studies. However, the extent to which the use of this subpopulation produces findings that can be extrapolated to other groups is questionable. The present study was designed to compare results from university-recruited psychology student gamblers to those obtained from a sample of gamblers recruited from the general population that also included students. An online survey measuring gambling behavior and Internet gambling, attitudes and knowledge about gambling and problem gambling severity was posted on websites accessed by gamblers. Participants were recruited from two sources, a psychology undergraduate university population (n = 461) and online websites (n = 4,801). Results showed university-recruited students differed significantly from both adults and students recruited from the general population in respect to demographic variables and gambling behavior. Psychology undergraduate students were younger, more likely to be female, and had lower incomes. When relevant demographic variables were controlled, psychology undergraduate students were found to gamble less frequently, at different times, and to be at lower-risk for gambling-related problems, but had more irrational beliefs and more negative attitudes towards gambling than gamblers recruited from the general population. Results suggest that caution should be used in extrapolating findings from research using university-recruited psychology student gamblers to wide community populations due to differences related to gambling thoughts, attitudes and behaviors. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

Funding

Other

History

Volume

30

Issue

1

Start Page

11

End Page

25

Number of Pages

15

ISSN

1050-5350

Publisher

Springer New York LLC

Peer Reviewed

  • Yes

Open Access

  • Yes

External Author Affiliations

Southern Cross University; University of Sydney

Era Eligible

  • Yes

Journal

Journal of Gambling Studies

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