File(s) not publicly available

Applying a revised two-factor model of impulsivity to predict health behaviour and well-being

© 2017 Elsevier LtdIndividual differences in reward drive and sensitivity, reward preference, and impulsivity lead some people to seek more frequent, and less healthy reward (e.g., energy-dense foods and illicit substances). Healthy lifestyle choices tend to be associated with higher well-being and overall life satisfaction, yet the links between reward traits, health-related behaviours and well-being remain unclear. The current study investigated the link between reward approach traits, behaviours, and quality of life outcomes in an online panel (n = 1619, ages 18–50). Reward drive (RD), based on the revised behavioural activation system (rBAS) was associated with higher overall well-being. This relationship was partially mediated by fruit and vegetable intake, exercise, and volunteering. Rash impulsivity (RI) was positively associated with drug, alcohol and tobacco use, poor diet, lack of sleep and gambling problems; and was also related to lower overall well-being. This relationship was partially mediated by lack of sleep. This suggests that individuals high in RD are likely to enjoy increased levels of overall well-being, partly due to their tendency to engage in healthy behaviours. Those high in RI are more likely to risk their health for hedonic risky pursuits; however, such risky pursuits appear to have little impact on well-being.

History

Volume

111

Start Page

250

End Page

255

Number of Pages

6

ISSN

0191-8869

Publisher

Pergamon Press

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

Acceptance Date

10/02/2017

External Author Affiliations

Southern Cross University

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Personality and Individual Differences

Usage metrics

Exports