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An exercise in resistance: Inoculation messaging as a strategy for protecting motivation during a monotonous and controlling exercise class

journal contribution
posted on 02.08.2018, 00:00 by JA Dimmock, M Gagné,, TC Howle, Amanda Rebar, B Jackson
Sustained attention has been devoted to studying the factors that support (or thwart) individuals’ enjoyment of, interest in, and value judgments regarding, their exercise activities. We employed a resistance-inducing (i.e., inoculation theory) messaging technique with the aim of protecting these desirable perceptions in the face of environmental conditions designed to undermine one’s positive exercise experiences. Autonomously-motivated exercisers (N = 146, Mage = 20.57, SD = 4.02) performed a 25-minute, group-based, instructor-led exercise circuit, in which the activities were deliberately monotonous, and during which the confederate instructor acted in a disinterested, unsupportive, and critical manner. Shortly before the session, participants received either a control message containing general information about the exercise class, or an inoculation message containing a forewarning about potential challenges to participants’ enjoyment/interest/value perceptions during the class, as well as information about how participants might maintain positive perceptions in the face of these challenges. Despite there being no between-condition differences in pre-session mood or general exercise motives, inoculated (relative to control) participants reported greater interest/enjoyment in the exercise session and higher perceptions of need support from the instructor. Perceptions of need support mediated the relationship between message condition and interest/enjoyment.

History

Volume

38

Issue

6

Start Page

567

End Page

578

Number of Pages

11

eISSN

1543-2904

ISSN

0895-2779

Publisher

Human Kinetics Publishers, USA

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

University of Western Australia

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology