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Addressing inequality and intolerance in human–wildlife coexistence

journal contribution
posted on 07.10.2020, 00:00 authored by NR Jordan, Bradley SmithBradley Smith, RG Appleby, LM van Eeden, HS Webster
Millennia of human conflict with wildlife have built a culture of intolerance toward wildlife among some stakeholders. We explored 2 key obstacles to improved human–wildlife coexistence: coexistence inequality (how the costs and benefits of coexisting with wildlife are unequally shared) and intolerance. The costs of coexisting with wildlife are often disproportionately borne by the so-called global south and rural communities, and the benefits often flow to the global north and urban dwellers. Attitudes and behaviors toward wildlife (tolerance versus intolerance) vary with social and cultural norms. We suggest more empathetic advocacy is needed that, for example, promotes conservation while appropriately considering those who bear the costs of conflict with wildlife. To achieve more equitable cost-sharing, we suggest limiting the costs incurred by those most affected or by sharing those costs more widely. For example, we advocate for the development of improved wildlife compensation schemes, increasing the scale of rewilding efforts, and preventing wildlife-derived revenue leaching out of the local communities bearing the costs of coexistence. © 2020 Society for Conservation Biology

History

Volume

34

Issue

4

Start Page

803

End Page

810

Number of Pages

8

eISSN

1523-1739

ISSN

0888-8892

Publisher

Wiley-Blackwell

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

Acceptance Date

06/12/2019

External Author Affiliations

University of Sussex, UK; University of New South Wales; Griffith University; University of Sydney

Author Research Institute

Appleton Institute

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Conservation Biology