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Acute loading and aging effects on myostatin pathway biomarkers in human skeletal muscle after three sequential bouts of resistance exercise

journal contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 authored by Vincent DalboVincent Dalbo, M Roberts, K Sunderland, C Poole, J Stout, T Beck, M Bemben, C Kerksick
To determine the influence of age and resistance exercise on myostatin pathway-related genes, younger (n = 10; 28 ± 5 years) and older (n = 10; 68 ± 6 years) men underwent four testing conditions (T1-T4). A baseline (T1) muscle sample was obtained, whereas the second and third biopsies were obtained 48 hours following the first and second training sessions (T2, T3), and a final biopsy was taken 24 hours following T3. The training sessions consisted of 3 sets of 10 repetitions (80% of one repetition maximum) on leg press, hack squat, and leg extension exercises. Follistatin (FST) messenger RNA was greater in older compared with younger men at T1 and T2 (p < .05). Follistatin-like 3 (FSTL3) messenger RNA was greater in older compared with younger men at T1 and T4 (p < .05). In older men, there was a significant decrease in myostatin (MSTN) messenger RNA at T4 (p < .05). Older men contained less active (Ser-425 phosphorylated) SMAD3 (p-SMAD3) protein than younger men at T3 and T4 (p < .05). Although it is well known that younger individuals possess a greater hypertrophic potential to resistance exercise, it appears that older individuals may paradoxically possess a more favorable resistance exercise response regarding myostatin pathway-related genes and a protein marker of pathway activity. Future research is warranted to examine the physiological significance of this age-dependent mechanism.

Funding

Category 1 - Australian Competitive Grants (this includes ARC, NHMRC)

History

Volume

66

Issue

8

Start Page

855

End Page

865

Number of Pages

11

eISSN

1758-535X

ISSN

1079-5006

Location

United States

Publisher

Oxford University Press

Language

en-aus

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

Faculty of Sciences, Engineering and Health; Institute for Health and Social Science Research (IHSSR); University of Missouri--Columbia; University of Oklahoma;

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Journals of gerontology : Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences.

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